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Kings Heath Boys

Pupil, Parent and Carer Weekly Bulletin

18th September 2020

A message from the Headteacher

Year 10 and 11 Parents

We are delighted to welcome back Year 10 and 11 today.  It is great to see how they have kept up to date with their learning in our live lessons and I am optimistic about the Year ahead.  Even in such unusual circumstances. 

We have consulted closely with Public Health England and as a result we have separated the Year 10 and 11 bubbles, whilst maintaining access to specialist rooms, to limit the chance of another bubble closure for both years.  Full details of the actions we are taking are shown below. 

Advice and actions to be taken to separate Y10 and 11 bubbles:

Recommendation

Action(s)

Separate where possible

Separate canteen servery and seating area

Year 11 servery 1 (LHS door) Year 10 servery 2 (RHS door)

 

Separate play and social spaces

Year 11 large AstroTurf and L Block playground / field

Year 10 small AstroTurf and GS block playground / field

Staggered start in the morning as before – arrival from 8.15am and straight into form time

Year 10 to leave at 2.35pm via Hollybank Road

Year 11 to leave at 2.40pm via Hollybank Road

Cleaning of areas used by both bubbles

5 minutes before end of lesson cleaning schedule to occur

Pupils use wipes to clean their desk/ chair/pc etc

Staff member to use spray / tissue to clean their areas and any touch point areas. eg door handles etc

Plenary session to be held with pupils standing at their desks to allow time between cleaning and changeover.

 

High frequency touch point areas to be cleaned at half way point of lessons by site staff on the ground floor

Door handles / sanitiser stations / Toilets etc

Ventilation

All rooms on ground floor to have doors and windows open for ventilation

 

Other control measures

Year 10 / 11 pupils will continue to wear masks on corridors even if local lockdown restrictions are lifted

 

Pupils to keep left on corridors.  Extra floor signage has been installed

 

Resources are not shared and bubble boxes used within classrooms

 

We will be holding a Year 10 & 11 parent forum on Microsoft teams on Monday 21st September at 5pm.  The link will be sent out on Monday.

 

Year 7 and 8 Parents 

Year 7 and 8 return to school on Tuesday 22nd September and we can’t wait to welcome them back.  To reassure you about the return, and to answer any questions that you may have, we are holding a Year 7 and 8 parent forum on Microsoft Teams on Monday 21st September at 6pm.  The link will be sent out on Monday.

 

Exciting opportunity for Y7-10 pupils

Your child has the opportunity to be part of an exciting and ground breaking study on Tuesday.  We are one of only four secondary schools in Birmingham invited to take part.  Your child has the chance to get tested for COVID-19 antibodies and the virus itself four times over the year.  It is an amazing opportunity.  Please see the information below about details of how to sign up online.  The deadline is next Monday 21st September and we hope to test up to 225 pupils.  Here is a useful link to a video explaining about the study https://youtu.be/TBsZM2IRATk

 

Dear Parent/Guardian,

Our school is taking part in the sKIDsPLUS (COVID-19 surveillance in Secondary Schools and Colleges), which aims to understand infection and transmission of the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, among students and staff in educational settings. Taking part will involve providing a nose swab, a throat swab, an oral fluid (saliva) sample and a blood sample at the beginning of the first term and then at the end of each term (4 visits). The doctors and nurses will come to the school to take the samples. All students taking part will be offered local anaesthetic (numbing) cream before the blood test is taken.

 

If you are interested in your child taking part, please click on the link below to find out more about sKIDsPLUS and what taking part will involve. Participation is on a first come, first serve basis and there is a limit of 225 children per school.

sKIDsPLUS for registration for parents/guardians of children under 16: https://snapsurvey.phe.org.uk/snapwebhost/s.asp?k=159865735744

Please do not share this link with anyone else - it is meant for your child only.

You must complete both the online consent form and questionnaire to take part - this should take less than 10 minutes If you agree to take part, we will email you the date of the first visit

If you have any questions, please contact us at: skidsplus@phe.gov.uk or via the sKIDsPLUS homepage https://snapsurvey.phe.org.uk/skidsplus

Thank you for your time,

The sKIDsPLUS team

STEP BY STEP GUIDE FOR PARENTS/GUARDIANS OF STUDENTS UNDER 16 YEARS

  1. 1.     Click the link: https://snapsurvey.phe.org.uk/snapwebhost/s.asp?k=159865735744
  2. On first page, select your child’s school from the drop down menu, click Next.
  1. This will take you to the Participant Information sheet, please read this carefully and contact the team if you have any questions before proceeding. If you are happy click Next.
  2. This page gives the eligibility criteria, confirm whether your child is eligible by clicking Yes or No.
  3. If yes, this takes you to the consent form. Read the statements carefully and tick the box below to indicate whether you agree to participate or not. There is also an optional extra to opt out of using leftover blood for future research.
  4. Next is a short questionnaire for you to complete on behalf of your child.
  5. If you have any questions or problems throughout the registration process, contact us at skidsplus@phe.gov.uk

 

Emergency Resilience Fund 

  • The Emergency Resilience Fund is still open for families in hardship due to Covid-19. If you have suffered loss of income and require support to buy food, medicines, essential supplies, data and utility bills please contact the school.

 Face Masks

All students must bring their own face masks to school.

 

 

Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson said:

Our priority is to get children back to school safely. At each stage we have listened to the latest medical and scientific advice. We have therefore decided to follow the World Health Organisation’s new advice. In local lockdown areas children in year 7 and above should wear face coverings in communal spaces. Outside of local lockdown areas face coverings won’t be required in schools, though schools will have the flexibility to introduce measures if they believe it is right in their specific circumstances. I hope these steps will provide parents, pupils and teachers with further reassurance. 

 

 

 

 

Over the next few weeks we will have a focus on making the roads around school safer for everyone. Watch out for key information to encourage walking and cycling.

You can do a few things right away-

Do not allow boys to get in and out of your car whilst the engine is running

Park up further away from school and ‘stride’ into school- 5 minutes of exercise

The Highway Code tells us not to park in or across driveways

Follow the flow of traffic rather than 3 point turns

 

11th September 2020

sKIDsPLUS (COVID-19 surveillance in Secondary Schools and Colleges) - Public Health England study

Please ensure that you have read the email I sent yesterday about this exciting opportunity at the school.  Sign-up will close towards the end of next week so please apply quickly.

Here is a link to a video explaining about the study – https://youtu.be/TBsZM2IRATk

 

Updated PHE flow chart and frequently asked questions – Attached to the bulletin today is the latest flow chart COVID-19 How to deal with symptoms in a member of staff or pupil in an educational setting.  This is the guidance we are using in dealing with the issues that present to us and it is good for you to understand the guidelines fully.  There is also a really useful document highlighting frequently asked questions.

 

School jumpers

Due to the need for good ventilation in classrooms, staff must have doors and windows open.  With this in mind it is a good idea for your child to have a school jumper (or wear a white t-shirt under their shirt).  Pupils are not allowed to wear coats in classrooms.

 

Parking and drop-off / pick-up

Many thanks for the majority of parents who are driving responsibly and dropping pupils away from school to walk the last few hundred metres.

May I also ask that we all please consider local residents when parking anywhere near school. 

  • Don’t park across drives
  • Be polite and respectful
  • Be safe – don’t double park or drop-off in the road

Remote Education: Excerpts from the National Guidance

The following two excerpts are from the national guidance on remote education. 

The key implications for us at Kings Heath will form the first part of CPD on Tuesday 15th September, followed by time in faculties to plan and support our arrangements.

Reopening Guidance Expectations

 

Where a class, group or small number of pupils need to self-isolate, or there is a local lockdown requiring pupils to remain at home, we expect schools to have the capacity to offer immediate remote education. Schools are expected to consider how to continue to improve the quality of their existing offer and have a strong contingency plan in place for remote education provision by the end of September. This planning will be particularly important to support a scenario in which the logistical challenges of remote provision are greatest, for example where large numbers of pupils are required to remain at home.

In developing these contingency plans, we expect schools to:

·       use a curriculum sequence that allows access to high-quality online and offline resources and teaching videos and that is linked to the school’s curriculum expectations

·       give access to high quality remote education resources

·       select the online tools that will be consistently used across the school in order to allow interaction, assessment and feedback and make sure staff are trained in their use

·       provide printed resources, such as textbooks and workbooks, for pupils who do not have suitable online access

·       recognise that younger pupils and some pupils with SEND may not be able to access remote education without adult support and so schools should work with families to deliver a broad and ambitious curriculum

When teaching pupils remotely, we expect schools to:

·       set assignments so that pupils have meaningful and ambitious work each day in a number of different subjects

·       teach a planned and well-sequenced curriculum so that knowledge and skills are built incrementally, with a good level of clarity about what is intended to be taught and practised in each subject

·       provide frequent, clear explanations of new content, delivered by a teacher in the school or through high-quality curriculum resources or videos

 

 

                                                             

·       gauge how well pupils are progressing through the curriculum, using questions and other suitable tasks and set a clear expectation on how regularly teachers will check work

·       enable teachers to adjust the pace or difficulty of what is being taught in response to questions or assessments, including, where necessary, revising material or simplifying explanations to ensure pupils’ understanding

·       plan a programme that is of equivalent length to the core teaching pupils would receive in school, ideally including daily contact with teachers

 

Tier 2 Lockdown Guidance

A rota system will limit the number of pupils on-site at any one time and break transmission chains within schools when scheduled time at home is long enough for the onset of symptoms to be detected before returning.

Schools should ideally operate a rota system that means pupils spend 2 weeks on-site followed by 2 weeks at home (so, 10 days on-site, with a weekend in between, followed by 16 days at home, or in their boarding house for pupils in residential settings who cannot return home). This allows more than sufficient time for symptoms to present themselves and for pupils to self-isolate and avoid transmitting the virus to others.

However, schools can choose to operate a one week rota (so, 5 days on-site, followed by 9 days at home) if this is necessary for the effective delivery of the curriculum. This should still allow time for symptoms to present in the vast majority of cases. The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies’ (SAGE) modelling of rota systems from the summer term has shown only a limited difference in the effectiveness of breaking transmission chains between one and 2 week rotas.

Rota lengths should not be any shorter than one week as this does not provide sufficient time off-site for symptoms to present.

Whilst a rota system aims to limit the total number of pupils on-site at any one time, we recognise that numbers on-site will be higher where there is a sizeable cohort of vulnerable children and young people and children of critical workers. It is important that full-time provision is available for these pupils and there is no fixed percentage of pupils on-site that schools should not exceed.

 

 Tier 1 Lockdown and Face Coverings

If Birmingham moves to a Tier 1 lockdown situation then the following guidance on face coverings will be implemented.

“An area moving into national intervention with restrictions short of education and childcare closure is described as ‘tier 1’. There are no changes to childcare, and the only difference in education settings is that where pupils in year 7 and above are educated, face coverings should be worn by adults and pupils when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.”

 

In the subsequent tiers of 2, 3 and 4 the same sentence regarding face coverings appears: “In all areas of national government intervention, education settings where pupils in year 7 and above are educated, face coverings should be worn by adults and pupils when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.”

 

COVID-19 How to deal with symptoms in a member of staff or pupil in an educational setting

It is vital if a member of staff or pupil starts to develop symptoms (high temperature, new continuous cough or loss or change to sense of smell or taste) that the school/educational establishment takes immediate action. Please inform BCC Public Health by filling out this form at https://forms.gle/SEu5SQQuSnLyfbjU6

Use the following flowchart to determine what actions to take, as advised by Public Health England.  Please note that this advice is subject to change.

If you are aware of a positive result for COVID-19 please phone PHE (Public Health England) on: 0344 2253560 option 0 option 2

For general advice please contact BCC Public Health Division by email:(using the subject heading: ‘education support’) BCCCOVID19@birmingham.gov.uk

If you require advice or guidance on Covid-19 issues please review the table below for useful telephone numbers and links:

Advice/Guidance

Email address:

General Advice:

BCC Public Health Division (using the subject heading ‘education support’)

 

BCCCOVID19@birmingham.gov.uk

Public Health England:

Inform Public Health England of all positive cases of Covid-19 immediately

Call 0344 225 3560 option 0 option 2

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/notifiable-diseases-and-causative-organisms-how-to-report

Ordering Tests:

Contact the NHS website.

You can call 119 or visit:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/testing-and-tracing/ask-for-a-test-to-check-if-you-have-coronavirus/

Infection, Prevention & Control Guidance:

  • Cleaning
  • Social Distancing
  • PPE

Please contact -

BCCCOVID19@birmingham.gov.uk

Occupational Health Guidance:

Schools should contact their Occupational Health Service provider. If this is BCC you can reach them at Occupational.Health@birmingham.gov.uk.

Employment Guidance:

Pls contact your designated HR lead (either in BCC or external)

 

  Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Covid-19 Symptoms, Symptomatic & Positive Result

What are Covid-19 symptoms?

The main symptoms of Covid-19 are:

  • a new continuous cough and/or
  • fever (temperature of 37.8 degrees or higher)
  • loss of or change in, normal sense of taste of smell (anosmia)

 

Children may also display gastrointestinal symptoms.

 

Please see link for symptoms: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/symptoms/

 

What is the mode of transmission?

Covid-19 is passed from person to person mainly by large respiratory droplets and direct contact (close unprotected contact, usually less than one metre).  These droplets can be directly inhaled by the person, or can land on surfaces which another person may touch which can lead to infection if they then touch their nose, mouth or eyes.

 

What is the incubation period?

The incubation period (i.e. time between exposure to the virus and developing symptoms) is between 1 and 14 days (median 5 days).

 

When is a person infectious?

A person is thought to be infectious 48 hours before symptoms appear, and up to seven days after they start displaying symptoms.

 

Are children at risk of infection?

Children of all ages can catch the infection but children make up a very small proportion of Covid-19 cases with about 1% of confirmed cases in England aged under 19 years.  Children also have a much lower risk of developing symptoms or severe disease.

 

Can children pass on the infection?

There is some uncertainty about how much asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic children transmit the disease but the evidence so far from a number of studies suggests children are less likely to pass it on and do not appear to play a major role in transmission.  Most children with Covid-19 have caught the infection from adults and not the reverse.  This is unlike flu.

 

Who should I notify if a staff member or child has symptoms?

Notify the Public Health Team at Birmingham City Council by completing the following form:

https://forms.gle/SEu5SQQuSnLyfbjU6

 

Who should I notify if a staff member or child is positive with Covid-19?

Notify Public Health England on 0344 2253560 option 0 option 2 and notify Public Health Team at Birmingham City Council by completing the following form:

https://forms.gle/SEu5SQQuSnLyfbjU6

 

Who is considered a contact in a school setting?

A person who wore appropriate PPE or maintained appropriate social distancing (over 2 metres) would not be classed as a contact.

 

A contact is defined as a person who has had contact (see below) at any time from 48 hours before onset of symptoms (or test if asymptomatic) to 10 days after onset of symptoms (or test)

  • A person who has had face-to-face contact (within one metre) with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus, including:
    • o Being coughed on, or
    • o Having a face-to-face conversation, or
    • o Having skin-to-skin physical contact, or
    • o Any contact within one metre for one minute or longer without face-to-face contact
  • A person who has been within 2 metres of someone who has tested positive for coronavirus for more than 15 minutes
  • A person who has travelled in a small vehicle with someone who has tested positive for Covid-19 or in a large vehicle near someone who has tested positive for Covid-19.
  • People who spend significant time in the same household as a person who has tested positive for Covid-19.

 

If setting has been notified of symptomatic pupil/staff member, should the rest of the class/bubble be excluded?

No, the class/bubble should continue to attend school as normal. The symptomatic case should stay at home and follow the stay at home guidance:  the staff member/child’s parents encouraged to get tested. Any siblings of the child attending the setting/staff’s household member should self-isolate for 14 days

 

Should a child/staff member come to school if a member of their household is unwell?

No. If a member of the child’s/staff member’s household is unwell with COVID-19 symptoms then the child/staff member should isolate for 14 days starting from the day the household member(s) became ill. If the child subsequently develops symptoms than they should isolate for 10 days from the date they developed symptoms. See Stay-at-home-guidance. The household member(s) should be tested within 5 days of symptom onset. If all symptomatic household members test negative, the child/staff member can return to work.

 

Can the siblings of a child who has been excluded because they are a contact of a case attend school?

Yes, other household members of the contact do not need to self-isolate unless the child, young person or staff member they live with in that group subsequently develops symptoms

 

If a child has COVID-19 symptoms, gets tested and tests negative, can they return to school even if they still have symptoms?

If the child is NOT a known contact of a confirmed case the child can return to school if the result is negative, provided they feel well and they have not had a fever for 48 hours.

 

If the child is a contact of a confirmed case, they must stay off school for the 14 day isolation period, even if they test negative. This is because they can develop the infection at any point within the 14 days (the incubation period for COVID-19), so if a child tests negative on day 3 they may still go on to develop the infection.

 

If a child who was a contact of a confirmed case tests negative, can they return to school? 

No, the child should complete 14 days of isolation. 

 

If I get confirmed cases does the school need to close?

The school does not need to close on public health grounds. Schools will generally only need to close if they have staff shortages due to illness or being identified as contacts. It is expected that only the class of a confirmed case will need to be excluded. If there are a number of confirmed cases across different classes and year groups at the same time then the school may be advised to close by the Health Protection Team in consultation with other partners.

 

What happens if the household member of a child/Staff member who attends school tests positive or is symptomatic?

The child should complete 14 days of isolation. No further action at the school is required. The bubble/close contacts of the child/staff member are not required to isolate or excluded from school UNLESS the child/staff member tests positive and they had attended the school in the 48 hours prior to developing symptoms. In this event, close contacts will be identified and advised regarding self-isolation.

 

What happens if a staff member/child has Covid-19 symptoms but feels well the next day and is unable to qualify for a Covid-19 test.  Can the staff member/child return to school and can their household end their 14 day isolation?  

The child/staff member should complete the 10 day self-isolation and the household should self-isolate for 14 days because they are contacts of the child/staff member.  If the symptoms disappear and 119 confirmed that they do not qualify for a Covid-19 test then they should book a test through the website for the entire household. 

 

The child/staff member and their household can only return to work/school if they have a negative test and they feel well and have not had a fever for 48 hours. 

 

If they are unable to obtain a test then they should complete the isolation period of 10 days and 14 days for the household to be on the safe side.

 

To book a test online please select the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/get-coronavirus-test

 

Should close contacts of a positive case get tested?

No, they are not required to get tested unless they develop symptoms during the 14 days of isolation.

 

Should educational settings ask parents to report pupils’ temperatures at the start of each day?

Parents, carers and settings do not need to take children’s temperatures every morning. Routine testing of an individual’s temperature is not a reliable method for identifying coronavirus (COVID-19).

 

Covid-19 Whistleblowing Telephone Number

What if the education setting is not adhering to the guidance?

You can contact Birmingham City Council whistleblowing on 0121 303 1116 and report any concerns you have.  All calls are anonymous.

 

Alternatively, you can notify Birmingham City Council Public Health by email using the following email address:

BCCCOVID19@birmingham.gov.uk

 

Testing

How can a parent/staff member arrange testing?

The parent can arrange for any child to be tested via NHS UK or by contacting NHS 119 via telephone if they do not have internet access.  A staff member can also arrange for a test using the same number above.

 

What if a parent refuses to get their child tested?

You should advise the parent to get their child tested if they have Covid-19 symptoms.  Unfortunately, a test is not compulsory however, it is advised in order to ascertain whether the child has Covid-19 symptoms and in order to establish whether the entire bubble should self-isolate for 14 days.

 

If a child gets tested and it is negative the child can return to school before 10 day isolation period ends only if they feel well and they do not have a fever for 48 hours

 

If a child does not get tested, they will have to remain at home for 10 days and you should notify Birmingham City Council Public Health by emailing BCCCOVID19@birmingham.gov.uk and they can arrange for a test to be hand delivered to the parent. 

 

Will the school be informed of any test results?

The school will be informed if a child or staff member tests positive as part of NHS Test and Trace. The school will not be informed of any negative results.

 

Can the school request to see negative test results before allowing pupils back in school?

No. Government advice states that schools “should not request evidence of negative results or other medical evidence before admitting children or welcoming them back after a period of self-isolation”

How can a staff member get tested?

All education and childcare workers are considered essential workers and can apply for a test if they are symptomatic via https://www.gov.uk/apply-coronavirus-test-essential-workers. 

 

Can they be tested if they do not have symptoms?

In general, only people displaying symptoms are eligible to be tested. However, people may be eligible for testing if the following applies:

  • your local council has asked you to take a test
  • you live in England and are told to take a test before you go into hospital, for example, for surgery
  • you’re taking part in a government pilot project

 

Please click on link for further guidance: https://www.gov.uk/testing-for-coronavirus

 

If a staff member was confirmed positive or a contact of a positive case, should they request a test after the isolation period has ended and only return to the setting if the test is negative?

If a staff member or child has been tested for Covid-19 and they are confirmed positive they will have to self-isolate for 10 days.  If a staff member/child is a contact of a positive case they will have to self-isolate for 14 days. 

 

There is no requirement for a staff member/child to be re-tested after the isolation period has ended in order to return to the setting.  But the staff member/child should only return to the setting if they feel well and they have not had a fever for 48 hours.

 

Covid-19 can develop at any time within the 14-day isolation period for contacts therefore, it is crucial that the contact self-isolates for the duration.  A person is thought to be infectious 48 hours before symptoms appear and up to seven days after they start displaying symptoms.  If a person has completed their 14-day self-isolation then they should no longer be infectious however, you should remind staff members to socially distance at all time and continue to wash their hands regularly.

 

Will antibody testing be available to school staff in Birmingham?

There is currently no antibody testing for school staff. Please see link to government guidance on antibody testing for school staff:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-antibody-tests/coronavirus-covid-19-antibody-tests#who-is-eligible-for-an-antibody-test 

 

How can we access the home testing kits for schools mentioned in the Government guidance for full opening of schools?

From 26 August, all schools and FE providers will receive an initial supply of 10 home test kits. Home test kits should only be offered to individuals in the exceptional circumstance that you believe an individual may have barriers to accessing testing elsewhere. The best and fastest way for students or staff to access a test is to visit a testing site.

This guidance is intended to support schools and FE providers in offering home test kits. It applies to all mainstream, special, alternative provision and FE providers.  Further guidance is provided on the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-home-test-kits-for-schools-and-fe-providers

Cleaning

What additional cleaning is necessary following a symptomatic or confirmed case?

All surfaces that the symptomatic person has come into contact with must be cleaned and disinfected, including:

  • objects which are visibly contaminated with body fluids
  • all potentially contaminated high-contact areas such as bathrooms, door handles, telephones, grab-rails in corridors and stairwells

 

Use disposable cloths or paper roll and disposable mop heads, to clean all hard surfaces, floors, chairs, door handles and sanitary fittings, following one of the options below: 

  • use either a combined detergent disinfectant solution at a dilution of 1,000 parts per million available chlorine or
  • a household detergent followed by disinfection (1000 parts per million available chlorine). Follow manufacturer’s instructions for dilution, application and contact times for all detergents and disinfectants or
  • if an alternative disinfectant is used within the organisation, this should be checked and ensure that it is effective against enveloped viruses

 

Avoid creating splashes and spray when cleaning. 

  • Wear disposable or washing-up gloves and aprons for cleaning.
  • Pay particular attention to frequently touched areas and surfaces, such as bathrooms, grab-rails in corridors and stairwells and door handles.
  • If an area has been heavily contaminated, such as with visible bodily fluids, use protection for the eyes, mouth and nose, as well as wearing gloves and an apron.
  • Any items that are heavily contaminated with body fluids and cannot be cleaned by washing should be disposed of.
  • All the disposable materials should be double-bagged, then stored securely for 72 hours then thrown away in the regular rubbish after cleaning is finished.
  • Wash hands regularly with soap and water for 20 seconds, and after removing gloves, aprons and other protection used while cleaning.

  

Do toilets need to be cleaned after every use?

Toilets are frequently touched surfaces, so they need to be cleaned frequently throughout the day, but not after every use (except if used by a symptomatic person whilst waiting to go home). 

 

Increase the frequency of cleaning toilets to at least five times a day:

  • Before school starts
  • After morning break
  • After lunch break
  • After afternoon break
  • At the end of the day

 

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Why are staff and pupils advised not to wear PPE in school?

Transmission of Covid-19 is usually through droplets; the mainstay of control measure are as follows for the risk to be minimal:

  • Minimising contact with individuals who are unwell by ensuring that those who have coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms, or who have someone in their household who does are excluded from the educational setting;
  • Cleaning hands more often than usual - wash hands thoroughly for 20 seconds with running water and soap and dry them thoroughly or use alcohol hand rub or sanitiser ensuring that all parts of the hands are covered
  • Ensuring good respiratory hygiene by promoting the ‘catch it, bin it, kill it’ approach
  • Cleaning frequently touched surfaces often using standard products because high contact surfaces will present the main risk in terms of indirect transmission
  • Minimising contact and mixing by altering, as much as possible, the environment (such as classroom layout) and timetables (such as staggered break times)

 

Why are face coverings not advised in Education settings?

  • There is no evidence of benefit in an Education setting
  • Can’t be managed by many children under the age of 11
  • Negative impact on communication thus education

 

It is recognised that evidence may change especially for Secondary school children and the advice remains under constant review.

 

Government advised in the media on 25/08/20 that secondary school pupils can wear face mask in communal areas for areas in local lockdown;

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/update-on-face-coverings-in-schools

No-one should be excluded from education on the grounds that they are not wearing a face covering and education settings should take steps to have a small contingency supply available to meet the needs of the students in case they forgot to bring face mask or if its soiled and unsafe to use.

 

 

High Risk Groups

 

Can our pregnant members of staff work? What if staff have pregnant household members?

Pregnant women are current advised to work from home where possible.  Education and childcare setting should endeavour to support this, for example, by asking staff to support remote education, carry out lesson planning or other roles which can be done from home. 

 

If they cannot work from home, they should be offered the safest available on-site roles, staying 2 metres away from others wherever possible, although the individual may choose to take on a role that does not allow for this distance if they prefer to do so.  If they have to spend time within 2 metres of other people, settings must carefully assess and discuss with them whether this involves an acceptable level of risk.

If a staff member lives with someone who is pregnant, they can work.

Should children or staff who are shielding (classed as clinically extremely vulnerable due to pre-existing medical conditions) attend school?

Current Government guidance is advising that you do not need to shield at the moment because coronavirus (COVID-19) disease levels in the community have fallen since the peak of the pandemic in England. The advice for people who were shielding is now the same as the advice for those who did not have to shield:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/covid-19-guidance-for-young-people-on-shielding-and-protecting-people-most-likely-to-become-unwell-if-they-catch-coronavirus (updated 18th August 2020).  This means:

  • All pupils should return to school from the beginning of the autumn term. This applies whatever your family circumstances or year group
  • you can go to work if the workplace is COVID-secure, but should carry on working from home wherever possible

 

Some pupils no longer required to shield but who generally remain under the care of a specialist health professional may need to discuss their care with their health professional before returning to school (usually at their next planned clinical appointment).

Should children or staff who have family in the shielding group be coming to school/work?

Yes, all pupils/staff including those who have household members in the shielding group are expected to return to school at the beginning of the autumn term

 

Attendance

 

Should I penalise pupils for non-attendance?

School attendance will be mandatory again from the beginning of the autumn term. This means from that point, the usual rules on school attendance will apply.

You should note however that a small number of pupils will still be unable to attend in line with public health advice because they are self-isolating and have had symptoms or a positive test result themselves; or because they are a close contact of someone who has coronavirus (COVID-19)

Where children are not able to attend school as parents are following clinical and/or public health advice, absence will not be penalised and it is expected that schools should be able to immediately offer them access to remote education.

 

Supply Staff

 

Can I use supply staff?

Government guidance states schools can continue to engage supply teachers and other staff during the pandemic.

Can supply staff move between settings?

Yes, however, school leaders will need to consider how to minimise the number of visitors to the setting and ensure the individuals comply with the settings arrangement of managing and minimising risks.

 

Educational Visits

Can we go on Educational visits?

Schools can go on non-overnight domestic Educational visits from the start of the autumn term and they should be done in line with protective measures. A thorough and full risk assessment should be undertaken to ensure the trip/visit can be done safely.

Schools should consider the Health and Safety on Educational visits guidance when planning visits:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/health-and-safety-on-educational-visits/health-and-safety-on-educational-visits

 

Do you have any school information leaflets/public health information in additional languages for our school community to use please?

Covid-19 related information in various languages can be found at the link below:

https://www.doctorsoftheworld.org.uk/coronavirus-information/#

 

Further Support and Guidance

 

Who can I contact for further support and guidance?

If you have any further queries you can contact Birmingham City Council Public Health Team by emailing BCCCOVID19@birmingham.gov.uk.  The email is checked throughout the day and your queries will be answered within 48 hours.

  Temporary Timetable in Detail

 

 

 

 

 

4th September 2020

 

 

Pupil, Parent and Carer weekly email

4th September 2020 

 

Dear pupil, parent or carer,

 

It has been so great to see you all this week and the return to school is in full swing.  Attendance has been superb and we look forward to this academic year more than any other.  Our simple motto at school is ‘Let’s make this work – together’, and our weekly emails should help us focus on the most important information that you need each week.

This week we should focus on two areas, travel to school and your responsibilities are if you have symptoms of Covid-19 or you are contacted by test and trace.

 

Travel to school

 

It is great to see so many pupils travelling by foot or bike, and those of you travel by public transport have shown incredible maturity in following guidelines to get to school safely.  Where we do have concern is drop of and collection of pupils.  The areas around Hollybank Road and especially Chamberlain / Chesterwood Road have become extremely congested and are posing safety issues.  We strongly encourage you to ‘Park and Stride’.  Please drop off your child away from the immediate school area an allow them to walk the last part of the journey.  Arrange to pick them up from the same spot away from school at the end of the day too.  Many thanks for your co-operation in working together to make the start and end of school safe.

 

Your responsibilities are if you have symptoms of Covid-19 or you are contacted by test and trace.

 

It is vitally important that you remain at home if you have symptoms of COVID-19.  To enable our bubbles to work effectively we rely on you all to take social responsibility to ensure we can keep all staff and pupils safe.  The guidance below has been published by Public health England and gives really useful advice that clarifies what to do if you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace.  All staff, parents and pupils should understand this.

 

Many thanks.

Chris Etheridge

Headteacher 

 

Guidance for contacts of people with confirmed Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection who do not live with the person

Updated 12 August 2020

 

Who is this guidance for?

This guidance is for people who have been notified by NHS Test and Trace that they are a contact of a person who has had a positive test result for COVID-19.

This guidance explains what you should do if the NHS Test and Trace service notifies you that you are a contact of a person who has tested positive for COVID-19 and you do not live with that person.

The NHS Test and Trace service will notify you by text message, email or phone.

What do we mean by a ‘contact’?

A ‘contact’ is a person who has been close to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 anytime from 2 days before the person was symptomatic up to 10 days from onset of symptoms (this is when they are infectious to others). For example, a contact can be:

  • people who spend significant time in the same household as a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
  • sexual partners
  • a person who has had face-to-face contact (within one metre), with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, including:
    • being coughed on
    • having a face-to-face conversation within one metre
    • having skin-to-skin physical contact, or
    • contact within one metre for one minute or longer without face-to-face contact
  • a person who has been within 2 metres of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 for more than 15 minutes
  • a person who has travelled in a small vehicle with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 or in a large vehicle or plane near someone who has tested positive for COVID-19

Where an interaction between 2 people has taken place through a Perspex (or equivalent) screen, this would not be considered sufficient contact, provided that there has been no other contact such as any of those indicated above.

Medical advice is clear: contacts of a person who has tested positive for COVID-19 must self-isolate at home because they are at risk of developing symptoms themselves in the next 14 days and could spread the virus to others before the symptoms begin.

If you are a contact of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, then you will be notified by the NHS Test and Trace service via text message, email or phone. If you are notified, please follow the guidance in this document closely.

If you have not been notified that you are a contact, this means you do not need to self-isolate and should follow the general guidance, for example, social distancing, hand-washing, and covering coughs and sneezes.

This guidance does not include health care workers and others working in health and social care settings, who should follow separate guidance.

What is a ‘support bubble’?

Adults who live alone or with dependent children only can, if they wish, now form a support bubble with one other household. All those in a support bubble will be able to spend time together inside each other’s homes, including overnight, without needing to stay 2 metres apart. Further information about support bubbles can be found in the meeting people from outside your household guidance. If you are in a support bubble and have had recent close contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, you may be contacted by the NHS Test and Trace service and asked to follow this guidance.

Main messages

  • If you have been informed that you are a contact of a person who has had a positive test result for COVID-19, medical advice is clear: you must immediately self-isolate at home for 14 days from the date of your last contact with them.
  • Stay at home for 14 days and follow the self-isolation guidance below. Do not go to work, school, or public areas, and do not use public transport or taxis.
  • You are at risk of developing COVID-19 for the next 14 days. Since we now know that people can become infectious up to 2 days before symptoms begin, you could spread the disease to others if you do not go into self-isolation.
  • Even if you never develop symptoms, you can still be infected and pass the virus on without knowing it.
  • You should not arrange for testing unless you develop symptoms of COVID-19. The most important symptoms are: a new continuous cough, a high temperature, a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia).
  • If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19, other people in your household do not need to self-isolate at home with you.
  • Take steps to reduce the possible spread of infection in your home: for example, wash your hands often for at least 20 seconds, using soap and water, or use hand sanitiser.
  • If anyone you live with is clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable stay away from them as much as possible, following the guidance here. For the clinically extremely vulnerable, follow the shielding guidance.

How will I be told I am a contact?

The NHS Test and Trace service will get in touch with anyone who is a contact of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 by text message, email or phone.

What should I do if I am a contact of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19?

If you have been informed that you are a contact, the medical advice is clear: you must immediately self-isolate at home for 14 days from the date of your last contact with the person who has tested positive for COVID-19.

Self-isolation means you must stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days.

It is very important that you follow this advice even if you feel well, as symptoms can take up to 14 days to appear from your last contact with the person who has tested positive for COVID-19.

Self-isolating in this way will help protect your family, friends, the wider community and the NHS.

I think I have had contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, but I have not been notified and advised to self-isolate. What should I do?

Contacts who need to self-isolate will be notified and advised accordingly by the NHS Test and Trace service. If you have not been notified, this means you do not need to self-isolate.

If you are concerned that you may have symptoms of coronavirus, or you live with someone who has symptoms of coronavirus, you must follow the Stay at Home: guidance for households with possible or confirmed COVID-19.

Self-isolation guidance

Stay at home for 14 days after your last contact with the person who has tested positive for COVID-19.

Do not go to work, school, or public areas, and do not use public transport or taxis.

You must not go outside even to buy food or other essentials, and any exercise must be taken within your home.

Self-isolating at home for the 14-day period will help protect your family, friends and the NHS. Self-isolating at home in this way can also protect the most vulnerable in society, by reducing the chance of a second wave of COVID-19 in the wider community.

If you are living with children, keep following this guidance to the best of your ability, however, we are aware that not all these measures will be possible.

We are also aware that not all these measures will be possible if you, or those you are living with, have significant conditions such as learning disabilities, autism or serious mental illness. Please keep following this guidance to the best of your ability, while keeping yourself and those close to you safe and well, ideally in line with any existing care plans.

If you live with clinically vulnerable people or clinically extremely vulnerable people, stay away from them as much as possible, following this guidance. For the clinically extremely vulnerable please follow the shielding guidance.

If you do not develop symptoms of COVID-19 while self-isolating at home

You must self-isolate at home for 14 days from the date of your last contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, even if you do not have any symptoms.

If you do not develop symptoms of COVID-19, you should not arrange for testing.

Your household does not need to self-isolate with you if you do not have symptoms of COVID-19, but they should take extra care to follow the guidance on social distancing, handwashing and respiratory hygiene. If you require help with buying groceries, other shopping or picking up medication, or walking a dog, you should ask friends or relatives.

Alternatively, you can order your shopping online and medication by phone or online. Delivery drivers should not come into your home, so make sure you ask them to leave items outside for collection.

Further guidance on accessing food and essential supplies is available.

If you are an employee and unable to work from home, please refer to this guidance from the Department for Work and Pensions to find out about the support that is available to you to help you to self-isolate.

We know that staying at home for a prolonged period can be difficult, frustrating and lonely for some, but you can do things to help make it easier or access the Every Mind Matters website.

What to do if you develop symptoms of COVID-19 during your 14 days of self-isolation at home

For most people, COVID-19 will be a mild illness. However, if you develop symptoms you must stay isolating at home and arrange to have a test to see if you have COVID-19 – visit NHS.UK to arrange or contact NHS 119 via telephone if you do not have internet access.

As soon as you start having symptoms, you and anyone in your household must follow the Stay at Home: Guidance for households with possible or confirmed COVID-19.

If your test is negative, then you must still complete the full 14 days of self-isolation, as you could still develop COVID-19. You should continue to follow the advice provided in this guidance.

Do the people I live with also need to self-isolate at home with me for 14 days?

If you are a contact of a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, but you do not have symptoms, other people living with you do not need to self-isolate and should follow the general guidance.

If you do develop symptoms of COVID-19, you should arrange to have a test to see if you have COVID-19 – visit NHS.UK to arrange or contact NHS 119 via telephone if you do not have internet access. If you live with other people, they must begin self-isolation at home while you wait for your test result. You must follow Stay at Home: Guidance for households with possible or confirmed COVID-19.

Self-isolating at home for the 14-day period will help protect your family, friends and the NHS. Self-isolating at home in this way can also protect the most vulnerable in society, by reducing the chance of a second wave of COVID-19 in the wider community.

What should I do if I live with someone who develops COVID-19 symptoms?

If someone you live with develops symptoms, then the clear medical advice is that they must self-isolate at home along with all the other people who live with them; this will include you.

They will need to arrange to have a test to see if they have COVID-19 – visit NHS.UK to arrange or contact NHS 119 via telephone if you do not have internet access.

They and the people who live with them must all follow Stay at Home: Guidance for households with possible or confirmed COVID-19.

Practise good hand and respiratory hygiene

Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, dry thoroughly or use hand sanitiser. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Cover coughs and sneezes.

Many people who are self-isolating find it helpful to remind themselves why what they are doing is so important. Some people are badly affected by COVID-19, particularly the clinically vulnerable and clinically extremely vulnerable. By staying home, you are protecting the lives of others; your friends, family and the wider community, as well as making sure the NHS does not get overwhelmed.

I think I have been in close contact with someone who is being tested for COVID-19, but they do not yet have a test result. What should I do?

At this stage, you do not need to self-isolate. You should take extra care in practising social distancing and good hand and respiratory hygiene.

Contacts of people who have tested positive for COVID-19 infection who need to self-isolate will be notified accordingly by the NHS Test and Trace service. If you have not been notified, this means you do not need to self-isolate.

What should I do if I develop symptoms of COVID-19 AFTER my 14 days of self-isolation at home?

If after 14 days of self-isolation you develop symptoms of COVID-19, you must immediately self-isolate again and arrange to have a test to see if you have COVID-19 – visit NHS.UK to arrange or contact NHS 119 via telephone if you do not have internet access.

You must follow Stay at Home: guidance for households with possible or confirmed COVID-19. If you live with other people, they must also self-isolate while awaiting your test results.

If your result is positive, you must self-isolate for 10 days. Other household members will need to self-isolate again for 14 days.

Will I need to self-isolate if I previously tested positive for COVID-19 but have now been notified that I am a contact of a person who has had a positive test result for COVID-19?

If you have previously tested positive for COVID-19, you will probably have developed some short-term immunity to the disease. However, it is not certain that will happen for everyone who has had COVID-19, nor do we know how long any immunity to the disease might last.

If you are notified that you are a contact of someone who has had a positive test result for COVID-19, you must immediately self-isolate and follow this guidance.

Self-isolating at home for 14 days is very important even if you have already had COVID-19. This will help protect your family, friends and the NHS. You will be helping to protect the most vulnerable in society, by limiting the spread of infection in the wider community and reducing the chance of a second wave of COVID-19.

If you start to have symptoms of COVID-19, you should arrange to have a test to see if you have COVID-19 – visit NHS.UK or contact NHS 119 via telephone if you do not have internet access. You must follow the Stay at Home: Guidance for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19).